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Author Topic: Animals are 'changing shape' in response to climate change  (Read 17 times)

Offline kafa88

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Animals are 'changing shape' in response to climate change
« on: September 09, 2021, 12:52:23 AM »



Wood rats have larger ears. Australian parrots have an unwieldy bill. And the change happened quickly. the researchers said The climate crisis sends natural selection into overdrive. A new study suggests Forcing animals to deal with rapidly warming temperatures through physical changes, or "shaping," raises specific questions: Can evolution follow the effects of human-driven carbon emissions?

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Over the past 150 years, Australian parrots such as the gang cockatoo and the red rumped parrot It has shown an average 10% increase in bill size, coupled with rising temperatures in natural habitats. According to research published Tuesday in the journal Trends. in ecology and evolution Sara Ryding, a researcher at Deakin University's School of Life and Environmental Sciences in Australia, said: "It's shocking to see these responses so early. during the climate crisis

We don't know if they'll catch up when the crisis worsens." The colorful feathered parrots aren't the only prey in the warmer world. Many birds in North America and Australia have seen an increase in bill size. Wood rats have larger ears. And some bats are waving their upgraded and larger wings.These larger organs are thought to help animals deal with hot climates. Because they have a larger surface area to release body heat. “This is not always an increase that is visible to the naked eye